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St. Andrew's Day

"Alba Gu Bràth!"

This newer tartan ( the Scottish Gaelic translation for “Scotland Forever”) was specially designed to celebrate the wide range of nationalities and communities to be found throughout Scotland. Designed to allow for pleating choices or printing on the bias to highlight the blue and white to create a visual representation of the Scottish National Flag - the St. Andrew’s Cross - a unifying banner for the wide diversity of peoples of the whole of Scotland. Happy St. Andrew's Day! 🏴󠁧󠁢󠁳󠁣󠁴󠁿

Happy St. Andrew's Day, November 30th!

The phrase Alba gu bràth is a Scottish Gaelic phrase used to express allegiance to Scotland. Idiomatically it translates into English as "Scotland forever".  The phrase is often used as a political slogan in the campaign for Scottish independence.

It has also been used on some Scotland Football National team shirts over the past few seasons. 

The phrase is parallel to the Irish Éirinn go Brách ("Ireland Forever"), Welsh language slogan "Cymru am byth" ("Wales forever"), the Breton "Breizh da viken" ("Brittany forever") or the Cornish language "Kernow bys vyken" ("Cornwall forever").

In the 1995 film Braveheart, Scottish patriot and national hero William Wallace (portrayed by Mel Gibson) shouts "Alba gu bràth" as he gallops across the front of his assembled Scottish troops just prior to the Battle of Stirling Bridge.

Designed by Steven Patrick Sim, the register notes are:

The tartan (which is the Scottish Gaelic translation of “Scotland Forever”) celebrates a multi-cultural and prosperous Scotland, looking forward into the future with a sense of openness and optimism. The vibrant design represents the wide range of nationalities and communities to be found throughout Scotland. The blue and white in the tartan creates a visual representation of St. Andrew’s Cross, the Flag of Scotland, a unifying banner for the wide diversity of peoples of the whole of Scotland.

For more on the history of Scotland's independence movements, click the stained glass of St. Andrew.