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Cream Tea Day

“My hour for tea is half-past five, and my buttered toast waits for nobody.”

~ Wilkie Collins, The Woman in White, 1859

Where do you stand on the Scone Wars? Do you prefer cream then jam, or jam then cream? Can you list the reasons why one is clearly preferable to the other? Do you secretly judge other's scone handling technique? Or are you just really hungry? The difference between how one treats one's scones - the Cornish and the Devonshire style cream tea - can be the cause of much controversy at tea time. The Devonshire (or Devon) method is to split the scone in two, cover each half with clotted cream, and then add strawberry jam on top. While in Cornwall, a cream tea may be traditionally served with a "Cornish split", a type of slightly sweet white bread roll, rather than a scone. Either way, the warm roll (or scone) is first buttered, then spread with strawberry jam, and finally topped with a spoonful of clotted cream. Strong opinions? Well then, let's not get into the pronunciation of "scone"! It's almost tea time! 🍵 🍞 🍓

Designed as a tribute for one of  the teas in Sazaby League's Afternoon Tea brand, this tartan design evokes the sweet and muted colors of a delicious cream tea.

Where do you stand on the Scone Wars?  Do you prefer cream then jam, or jam then cream?  


The difference between the Cornish and the Devonshire style cream tea can be the cause of much controversy at tea time.  The Devonshire (or Devon) method is to split the scone in two, cover each half with clotted cream, and then add strawberry jam on top.  While in Cornwall, a cream tea may be traditionally served with a "Cornish split", a type of slightly sweet white bread roll, rather than a scone. Either way, the warm roll (or scone) is first buttered, then spread with strawberry jam, and finally topped with a spoonful of clotted cream. 

For a list of cream tea etiquette tips from the UK's Cream Tea Society (should you need any), click the cup of tea!