Officially registered tartan graphics on this site courtesy of The Scottish Tartans Authority.  Other tartans from talented tartan artists may also be featured.

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Jun 20

International Surfing Day

Summer Beach
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Catch a Wave
Photo by Clark Little
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Cowabunga! 🏄‍♂️🏖️👣

Surf's up! The iconic 1966 film The Endless Summer, documented two California surfers who hit the road to follow summer and surf around the world, visiting Senegal, Ghana, Nigeria, South Africa, Australia, New Zealand, Tahiti, Hawaii and California. Somehow they missed the surfing in Scotland! On the mainland the most famous stretch of surfing coast is found on the north coast. But you can still find surfing waves in the Shetland Islands! Surfing became popular in Scotland on the east coast in the mid to late 1960s, with small groups of surfers forming around the Fraserburgh, Aberdeen, and Edinburgh regions. Andy Bennetts from Edinburgh, and his friends Stuart Crichton and Ian Wishart, thought they were the only surfers in the country when, in September of 1968, they set off for Aberdeen on the train to try out Bennetts's new board, which he'd purchased on a holiday to Cornwall. When they arrived, they found that local George Law, had already been surfing there since 1967. The small town of Thurso boasts the best right-hand breaking wave in Europe and, despite its climatic disposition, has managed to spawn a group of hardened surfers. Hang Ten, dudes!🏄‍♂️🏄‍♀️🏄‍♂️

By designer Carol A.L. Martin, this tartan speaks to the colours of sand, sea, sky, and sun in the summer.

International Surfing Day celebrates the sport and culture of surfing. Though most associated with warmer climes, there is surfing in Scotland, although the best surf, unfortunately, is in the winter, which means freezing temperatures, snow, and gales, and often with little light.

On the mainland the most famous stretch of surfing coast is found on the north coast. But you can travel up to 60°N in Scotland and still find surfing waves in the Shetland Islands.

Surfing first started in Scotland on the east coast in the mid to late 1960s, with small groups of surfers forming around the Fraserburgh, Aberdeen, and Edinburgh regions. Andy Bennetts from Edinburgh, and his friends Stuart Crichton and Ian Wishart, thought they were the only surfers in the country when, in September of 1968, they set off for Aberdeen on the train to try out Bennetts's new board, which he'd purchased on a holiday to Cornwall.

When they arrived at Aberdeen, however, and asked a friendly man at the beach pavilion if they could leave the board with him for safekeeping, they were surprised to discover that he already looked after a board for another surfer - local lad George Law, who'd been surfing there since 1967.

The small town of Thurso boasts the best right-hand breaking wave in Europe and, despite its climatic disposition, has managed to spawn a group of hardened surfers.

If the thought of the icy surf in Scotland gives you shivers, keep warm by clicking Clark Little's photograph "Catch a Wave" showing a beautiful sunset on the favorite surfing North Shore of Oahu, Hawaii, and read about some other fabulous surfing locales.