Officially registered tartan graphics on this site courtesy of The Scottish Tartans Authority.  Other tartans from talented tartan artists may also be featured.

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tartaned kilt flip when going regimental! 

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Jul 27

Scotch Day

Scotch Whisky
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"Depend na on the doctor's skill, His powder, potion, or his pill; For black draught tank' the blue - a gill O' guid auld Highland Whisky O"

Do you know your Glenlivet from your Glenfiddich and your Bruichladdich from your Bunnahabhain? Well on Scotch Whisky Day, delve into the blends or single malts of your choice! This tartan was designed to celebrate the water of life (uisge beatha) and to pay tribute to the ‘Spiritual home of Scotch’ reckoned by some as Lindores Abbey, Fife, where the first written record of whisky production was noted in the Exchequer Rolls of Scotland in 1494. Considered to be the industry's founding document, it records Brother Cor, a ‘Grey Monk’ of the Tironensian Order, being charged with the commission of making "acqua vitae" by King James IV.   Slainte! 🥃

A new tartan created by Stephen Patrick Sims, the Scotch Whisky tartan was designed to celebrate the water of life and to pay tribute to the ‘Spiritual home of Scotch’ (Lindores Abbey, Fife), remembering the first written record of whisky production in the Exchequer Rolls of Scotland, the 1st of June 1494.

 

From the official register:

Considered to be the industry's founding document, it records Brother Cor, a ‘Grey Monk’ of the Tironensian Order, being charged with the commission of making "acqua vitae" by King James IV.  The tartan was created to tell this story.

 

Colours and Geometry: Blue is the pure Scottish water used to make the spirit, the three stripes representing the ‘Holy Burn’, the water source used by the Monks of Lindores Abbey; Dark Grey represents John Cor and the robes of the Tironensian Order; Russet Brown represents the traditional oak cask used for maturation, the shade between the brown and grey alluding also to the copper pot still; Ochre represents the ‘eight bolls of malt’, the shade between the ochre and grey representing the yeast; Yellow and Amber combine to represent the Scotch Whisky itself, with yellow shades in the tartan representing the ancient barley fields surrounding Lindores Abbey in 1494.

This tartan is companion to Stephen Patrick Sims' Angel's Share whisky tartan, which refers to the loss of liquid during whisky production said to go "to the angels."

For more on the historic Lindores Abbey Distillery, click the whisky glass.  Slainte!