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Waitangi Day

"But give to me the care-free life
by mountain, lake or shore
of the lovely land of the Long White Cloud,
Our Homeland Aotearoa."

~ Our Homeland Aotearoa, The Tui in the Kowhai, lyrics by A.. Hall, 1920s

Waitangi Day, the national day of New Zealand, commemorates the signing on 6 February 1840 of the Treaty of Waitangi. In that year, representatives of the British Crown and over 500 Māori chiefs signed what is often considered to be New Zealand’s founding document. The day was first officially commemorated in 1934, and it has been a public holiday since 1974. Aotearoa, the Māori name for New Zealand, is generally translated to mean "long white cloud," referring to the cloud formations which helped early Polynesian navigators find the country. This tartan was designed for use by all New Zealanders with black representing the famous 'All Blacks' rugby team, grey for the multi cultural makeup of the population and the white for the snow of the mountains. 🇳🇿

Feb 6

Pride of New Zealand
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All Blacks
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Waitangi Day is the national day of New Zealand, and commemorates the signing, on 6 February 1840, of the Treaty of Waitangi.   The treaty was signed by representatives acting on behalf of the British Crown and, initially, about 45 Māori chiefs. Over the course of the next seven months, copies of the treaty were toured around the country to give other chiefs the opportunity to sign. The signing had the effect of securing British sovereignty over the islands of New Zealand, which was officially proclaimed on 21 May 1840.


This tartan was designed by Ivan Coward for use by all New Zealanders with black representing the famous 'All Blacks' rugby team, grey for the multi cultural makeup of the population and the white for the snow of the mountains.


To see one of the All Blacks greatest pre-match tradition hakas (the traditional ceremonial Māori  dance or challenge) ahead of the final of Rugby World Cup 2011 in New Zealand against the French, click the All Blacks!