Officially registered tartan graphics on this site courtesy of The Scottish Tartans Authority.  Other tartans from talented tartan artists may also be featured.

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May 2

Loch Ness Monster Day

Nessie
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Nessie
Commonwealth Opening Ceremonies 2014
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Although accounts of an aquatic beast living in Scotland’s Loch Ness date back 1,500 years, the modern legend of the Loch Ness Monster was born when a sighting made local news on May 2, 1933. The newspaper Inverness Courier related an account of a local couple who claimed to have seen “an enormous animal rolling and plunging on the surface.” 

One year later the famous "surgeon's photograph", a photo of the creature's head and neck, entered the canon of sightings.  Supposedly taken by Robert Kenneth Wilson, a London gynaecologist, he was purportedly looking at the loch when he saw the monster, grabbed his camera and snapped four photos. For 60 years the photo was considered evidence of the monster's existence, although sceptics dismissed it as driftwood, an elephant, an otter, or a bird. The photo's scale was controversial; it is often shown cropped (making the creature seem large and the ripples like waves), while the uncropped shot shows the other end of the loch and the monster in the centre. The ripples in the photo were found to fit the size and pattern of small ripples, unlike large waves photographed up close. Analysis of the original image fostered further doubt. In 1993, the makers of the Discovery Communications documentary Loch Ness Discovered analysed the uncropped image and found a white object visible in every version of the photo (implying that it was on the negative). It was believed to be the cause of the ripples, as if the object was being towed, although the possibility of a blemish on the negative could not be ruled out. An analysis of the full photograph indicated that the object was small, about 60 to 90 cm (2 to 3 ft) long.

Google commemorated the 81st anniversary of the "surgeon's photograph" with a Google Doodle,  and added a new feature to Google Street View with which users can explore the loch above and below the water. Google reportedly spent a week at Loch Ness collecting imagery with a street-view "trekker" camera, attaching it to a boat to photograph above the surface and collaborating with members of the Catlin Seaview Survey to photograph underwater. 

Google has even been accused of covering up the existence of the Loch Ness monster by blurring one of its maps.   Several people claim to have found sightings by perusing these maps!

Regardless, this tartan was created for Loch Ness monster lovers all over the world. Colours: dark blue for Loch Ness; green for the hills and glens surrounding Loch Ness; white for the clouds reflecting on the loch; blue for the skies of a sunny highland day and the dark colour of Nessie's skin.

To use the Google views to search for Nessie yourself, click the picture of opening ceremonies for the 2014 Commonwealth Games in Glasgow.