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Jun 8

World Oceans Day

Glaz
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Miranda
John William Waterhouse, 1875
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"And I have loved thee, ocean! And my joy Of youthful sports was on thy breast to be Borne, like thy bubbles, onward: from a boy I wanton'd with thy breakers-they to me Were a delight; and if the freshening sea Made them a terror-'twas a pleasing fear, For I was as it were a child of thee, And trusted to thy billows far and near, And laid my hand upon thy mane - as I do here." ~ The Dark, Blue Sea, George Gordon, Lord Byron, Childe Harold's Pilgrimage, (1812-1818)

Glaz is a poetic Breton word for a colour used to describe the changing greens, blues and greys of the sea. From the bright blues and turquoises of clear weather to the pink-orange reflections at sunset and sunrise, the colour palette of deep oceans and inland seas have inspired poets and artists since ancient times. In many cases, these colours are dependent on the organic and mineral particles, and other dissolved substances in the water. Colours can also vary depending on the phytoplankton species present in marine areas: dinoflagellate species can cause real “red tides”; coccolithophores turn the sea milky; and diatoms can make it appear green. When the waters are low in phytoplankton, the color of the sea may tends to indigo or violet such as in the Pacific Ocean near Easter Island, where the clearest water in the world is observed!

World Oceans Day is an annual observation to honour the world's oceans, celebrate the products the ocean provides such as seafood as well as marine life itself for aquariums, pets, and a time to appreciate its own intrinsic value.

Glaz is a poetic Breton word for a colour used to describe the changing greens, blues and greys of the sea.  From the bright blues and turquoises of clear weather to the pink-orange reflections at sunset and sunrise, the colour palette of deep oceans and inland seas have inspired poets and artists since ancient times. In many cases, these colours are dependent on the organic and mineral particles, and other dissolved substances in the water.  Colours can also vary depending on the phytoplankton species present in marine areas: dinoflagellate species can cause real “red tides”;  coccolithophores turn the sea milky; and diatoms can make it appear green.  When the waters are low in phytoplankton, the color of the sea may tends to indigo or violet such as in the Pacific Ocean near Easter Island, where the clearest water in the world is observed!

 

For a collection of well known paintings showing the different colours of the ocean, click the painting "Miranda" by John Williams Waterhouse, 1875, from Shakespeare's The Tempest.