Officially registered tartan graphics on this site courtesy of The Scottish Tartans Authority.  Other tartans from talented tartan artists may also be featured.

  • Facebook - Grey Circle
  • Twitter - Grey Circle
  • YouTube - Grey Circle

This site is featured on:​   boredalot.com   &   pointlesssites.com

9 out of 10 kilt wearers agree - this is almost as thrilling as a good

tartaned kilt flip when going regimental! 

In a tartan mood? Tag along on social media

Mar 5

St. Piran's Day

Cornish National
Show More
Cornish Chough
Chough on the Lizard Peninsula, Cornwall
Show More

"Where not a sound is heard But the white waves, O bird, And slippery rocks fling back the vanquish'd sea, Thou soarest in thy pride, Not heeding storm or tide; In Freedom's temple nothing is more free." ~ The Cornish Chough, John Harris (1820-1884)

Each colour in the National Tartan has a special meaning: White on Black for St. Piran's Banner (The Patron Saint of Tinners), Black and Gold were the colours of the ancient Cornish kings; red is for the beak and legs of the Chough, the Cornish National bird, and blue is for the sea surrounding Cornwall.

Saint Piran or Pyran was a 5th-century Cornish abbot and saint, supposedly of Irish origin. He is the patron saint of tin-miners, and is also generally regarded as the patron saint of Cornwall

 

The ancient kingdom of Cornwall is remembered in this tartan, designed by the Cornish poet, E.E. Morton-Nance, in 1984 . He regarded tartan as the "heritage of all Celts" and extolled brave Cornishmen to wear the kilt of black and saffron, "Tints blazoned by her ancient Kings". 

Each colour in the National Tartan has a special meaning: White on Black for St. Piran's Banner (The Patron Saint of Tinners), Black and Gold were the colours of the ancient Cornish kings; red is for the beak and legs of the Chough, the Cornish National bird and blue is for the sea surrounding Cornwall. The ancient kingdom of Cornwall is remembered in this tartan, designed by the Cornish poet, E.E. Morton-Nance in 1963 . He regarded tartan as the "heritage of all Celts" and extoll brave Cornishmen to wear the kilt of black and saffron, "Tints blazoned by her ancient Kings". 

For more on Cornish wildlife, click the national bird, the Chough.