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Lughnasadh

"And after seven nights
of summer's brightness Weed-month slips
into the dwellings; everywhere August brings
to peoples of the earth Lammas Day. So autumn comes,
after that number of nights but one
bright, laden with fruits. Plenty is revealed,
beautiful upon the earth."

~ The Anglo-Saxon Menologium, 10th century

"And after seven nights
of summer's brightness Weed-month slips
into the dwellings; everywhere August brings
to peoples of the earth Lammas Day. So autumn comes,
after that number of nights but one
bright, laden with fruits. Plenty is revealed,
beautiful upon the earth."

~ The Anglo-Saxon Menologium, 10th century


This tartan was created for all druids to wear. It was designed by Isaac Bonewits, the founder of Ár nDraíocht Féin, a druid fellowship.


Druids were members of the high-ranking class in ancient Celtic cultures, dating back to at least the 4th century BC.  The word Druid is related to later Celtic word forms such as  Old Irish druí 'druid, sorcerer', Old Cornish druw, and Middle Welsh dryw 'seer; wren' and may be based on a word which meant "oak-knower".   Contemporary sources from this time report Druids to be  responsible for organizing worship and sacrifices, divination, and judicial procedure in Gallic, British, and Irish societies.    


Ancient taditions were widely observed throughout Ireland, Scotland and the Isle of Man for the seasonal festivals of Imbolc, Bealtaine, Lughnasadh and Samhain.   


For more neo-Druidic traditions and ceremonies, click the painting of The Druidess, by Alexander Cabanel.